Prescription Drug Information: Bisoprolol Fumarate and Hydrochlorothiazide (Page 2 of 6)

CLINICAL STUDIES

In controlled clinical trials, bisoprolol fumarate/hydrochlorothiazide 6.25 mg has been shown to reduce systolic and diastolic blood pressure throughout a 24-hour period when administered once daily. The effects on systolic and diastolic blood pressure reduction of the combination of bisoprolol fumarate and hydrochlorothiazide were additive. Further, treatment effects were consistent across age groups (< 60, ≥ 60 years), racial groups (black, nonblack), and gender (male, female).

In two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials conducted in the U.S., reductions in systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate 24 hours after dosing in patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension are shown below. In both studies mean systolic/diastolic blood pressure and heart rate at baseline were approximately 151/101 mm Hg and 77 bpm.

Sitting Systolic / Diastolic Pressure ( BP ) and Heart Rate ( HR )
Mean Decrease ( Δ ) After 3 - 4 Weeks
Study 1 Study 2
Placebo B 5 / H 6 . 25 mg Placebo H 6 . 25 mg B 2 . 5 / H 6 . 25 mg B 10 / H 6 . 25 mg

a) Observed mean change from baseline minus placebo

n= 75 150 56 23 28 25
Total ΔBP (mm Hg) -2.9/-3.9 -15.8/-12.6 -3.0/-3.7 -6.6/-5.8 -14.1/-10.5 -15.3/-14.3
Drug Effect a -/- -12.9/-8.7 -/- -3.6/-2.1 -11.1/-6.8 -12.3/-10.6
Total ΔHR(bpm) -0.3 -6.9 -1.6 -0.8 -3.7 -9.8
Drug Effect a - -6.6 - +0.8 -2.1 -8.2

Blood pressure responses were seen within 1 week of treatment but the maximum effect was apparent after 2 to 3 weeks of treatment. Overall, significantly greater blood pressure reductions were observed on bisoprolol fumarate and hydrochlorothiazide than on placebo. Further, blood pressure reductions were significantly greater for each of the bisoprolol fumarate plus hydrochlorothiazide combinations than for either of the components used alone regardless of race, age, or gender. There were no significant differences in response between black and nonblack patients.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

Bisoprolol fumarate and hydrochlorothiazide tablets are indicated in the management of hypertension.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Bisoprolol fumarate and hydrochlorothiazide tablets are contraindicated in patients in cardiogenic shock, overt cardiac failure (see WARNINGS), second or third degree AV block, marked sinus bradycardia, anuria, and hypersensitivity to either component of this product or to other sulfonamide-derived drugs.

WARNINGS

Cardiac Failure

In general, beta-blocking agents should be avoided in patients with overt congestive failure. However, in some patients with compensated cardiac failure, it may be necessary to utilize these agents. In such situations, they must be used cautiously.

Patients Without a History of Cardiac Failure

Continued depression of the myocardium with beta-blockers can, in some patients, precipitate cardiac failure. At the first signs or symptoms of heart failure, discontinuation of bisoprolol fumarate and hydrochlorothiazide should be considered. In some cases bisoprolol fumarate and hydrochlorothiazide therapy can be continued while heart failure is treated with other drugs.

Abrupt Cessation of Therapy

Exacerbations of angina pectoris and, in some instances, myocardial infarction or ventricular arrhythmia, have been observed in patients with coronary artery disease following abrupt cessation of therapy with beta-blockers. Such patients should, therefore, be cautioned against interruption or discontinuation of therapy without the physician’s advice. Even in patients without overt coronary artery disease, it may be advisable to taper therapy with bisoprolol fumarate and hydrochlorothiazide over approximately 1 week with the patient under careful observation. If withdrawal symptoms occur, beta-blocking agent therapy should be reinstituted, at least temporarily.

Peripheral Vascular Disease

Beta-blockers can precipitate or aggravate symptoms of arterial insufficiency in patients with peripheral vascular disease. Caution should be exercised in such individuals.

Bronchospastic Disease

PATIENTS WITH BRONCHOSPASTIC PULMONARY DISEASE SHOULD, IN GENERAL, NOT RECEIVE BETA-BLOCKERS. Because of the relative beta 1 -selectivity of bisoprolol fumarate, bisoprolol fumarate and hydrochlorothiazide may be used with caution in patients with bronchospastic disease who do not respond to, or who cannot tolerate other antihypertensive treatment. Since beta 1 -selectivity is not absolute, the lowest possible dose of bisoprolol fumarate and hydrochlorothiazide should be used. A beta 2 agonist (bronchodilator) should be made available.

Major Sugery

Chronically administered beta-blocking therapy should not be routinely withdrawn prior to major surgery; however, the impaired ability of the heart to respond to reflex adrenergic stimuli may augment the risks of general anesthesia and surgical procedures.

Diabetes and Hypoglycemia

Beta-blockers may mask some of the manifestations of hypoglycemia, particularly tachycardia. Nonselective beta-blockers may potentiate insulin-induced hypoglycemia and delay recovery of serum glucose levels. Because of its beta 1 -selectivity, this is less likely with bisoprolol fumarate; however, patients subject to spontaneous hypoglycemia, or diabetic patients receiving insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents, should be cautioned about these possibilities. Also, latent diabetes mellitus may become manifest and diabetic patients given thiazides may require adjustment of their insulin dose. Because of the very low dose of HCTZ employed, this may be less likely with bisoprolol fumarate and hydrochlorothiazide.

Thyrotoxicosis

Beta-adrenergic blockade may mask clinical signs of hyperthyroidism, such as tachycardia. Abrupt withdrawal of beta-blockade may be followed by an exacerbation of the symptoms of hyperthyroidism or may precipitate thyroid storm.

Renal Disease

Cumulative effects of the thiazides may develop in patients with impaired renal function. In such patients, thiazides may precipitate azotemia. In subjects with creatinine clearance less than 40 mL/min, the plasma half-life of bisoprolol fumarate is increased up to threefold, as compared to healthy subjects. If progressive renal impairment becomes apparent, bisoprolol fumarate and hydrochlorothiazide should be discontinued. (See Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism).

Hepatic Disease

Bisoprolol fumarate and hydrochlorothiazide should be used with caution in patients with impaired hepatic function or progressive liver disease. Thiazides may alter fluid and electrolyte balance, which may precipitate hepatic coma. Also, elimination of bisoprolol fumarate is significantly slower in patients with cirrhosis than in healthy subjects. (See Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism).

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