Prescription Drug Information: Carisoprodol (Page 2 of 4)

7.2 CYP2C19 Inhibitors and Inducers

Carisoprodol is metabolized in the liver by CYP2C19 to form meprobamate [ see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ]. Co-administration of CYP2C19 inhibitors, such as omeprazole or fluvoxamine, with carisoprodol could result in increased exposure of carisoprodol and decreased exposure of meprobamate. Co-administration of CYP2C19 inducers, such as rifampin or St. John’s Wort, with carisoprodol could result in decreased exposure of carisoprodol and increased exposure of meprobamate. Low dose aspirin also showed an induction effect on CYP2C19. The full pharmacological impact of these potential alterations of exposures in terms of either efficacy or safety of carisoprodol is unknown.

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy: Pregnancy Category C.

There are no data on the use of carisoprodol during human pregnancy. Animal studies indicate that carisoprodol crosses the placenta and results in adverse effects on fetal growth and postnatal survival. The primary metabolite of carisoprodol, meprobamate, is an approved anxiolytic. Retrospective, post-marketing studies do not show a consistent association between maternal use of meprobamate and an increased risk for particular congenital malformations.

Teratogenic effects: Animal studies have not adequately evaluated the teratogenic effects of carisoprodol. There was no increase in the incidence of congenital malformations noted in reproductive studies in rats, rabbits, and mice treated with meprobamate. Retrospective, post-marketing studies of meprobamate during human pregnancy were equivocal for demonstrating an increased risk of congenital malformations following first trimester exposure. Across studies that indicated an increased risk, the types of malformations were inconsistent.

Nonteratogenic effects: In animal studies, carisoprodol reduced fetal weights, postnatal weight gain, and postnatal survival at maternal doses equivalent to 1-1.5 times the human dose (based on a body surface area comparison). Rats exposed to meprobamate in-utero showed behavioral alterations that persisted into adulthood. For children exposed to meprobamate in-utero, one study found no adverse effects on mental or motor development or IQ scores. Carisoprodol should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the risk to the fetus.

8.2 Labor and Delivery

There is no information about the effects of carisoprodol on the mother and the fetus during labor and delivery.

8.3 Nursing Mothers

Very limited data in humans show that carisoprodol is present in breast milk and may reach concentrations two to four times the maternal plasma concentrations. In one case report, a breast-fed infant received about 4-6% of the maternal daily dose through breast milk and experienced no adverse effects. However, milk production was inadequate and the baby was supplemented with formula. In lactation studies in mice, female pup survival and pup weight at weaning were decreased. This information suggests that maternal use of carisoprodol may lead to reduced or less effective infant feeding (due to sedation) and/or decreased milk production. Caution should be exercised when carisoprodol is administered to a nursing woman.

8.4 Pediatric Use

The efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of carisoprodol in pediatric patients less than 16 years of age have not been established.

8.5 Geriatric Use

The efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of carisoprodol in patients over 65 years old have not been established.

8.6 Renal Impairment

The safety and pharmacokinetics of carisoprodol in patients with renal impairment have not been evaluated. Since carisoprodol is excreted by the kidney, caution should be exercised if carisoprodol is administered to patients with impaired renal function. Carisoprodol is dialyzable by hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis.

8.7 Hepatic Impairment

The safety and pharmacokinetics of carisoprodol in patients with hepatic impairment have not been evaluated. Since carisoprodol is metabolized in the liver, caution should be exercised if carisoprodol is administered to patients with impaired hepatic function.

8.8 Patients with Reduced CYP2C19 Activity

Patients with reduced CYP2C19 activity have higher exposure to carisoprodol. Therefore, caution should be exercised in administration of carisoprodol to these patients. [ see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ].

9 DRUG ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE

9.1 Controlled Substance

Carisoprodol is a Schedule IV controlled substance. Carisoprodol has been subject to abuse, misuse, and criminal diversion for nontherapeutic use [ see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) ].

9.2 Abuse

Abuse of carisoprodol poses a risk of overdosage which may lead to death, CNS and respiratory depression, hypotension, seizures and other disorders [ see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Overdosage (10) ]. Patients at high risk of carisoprodol abuse may include those with prolonged use of carisoprodol, with a history of drug abuse, or those who use carisoprodol in combination with other abused drugs.

Prescription drug abuse is the intentional non-therapeutic use of a drug, even once, for its rewarding psychological effects. Drug addiction, which develops after repeated drug abuse, is characterized by a strong desire to take a drug despite harmful consequences, difficulty in controlling its use, giving a higher priority to drug use than to obligations, increased tolerance, and sometimes physical withdrawal. Drug abuse and drug addiction are separate and distinct from physical dependence and tolerance (for example, abuse or addiction may not be accompanied by tolerance or physical dependence) [ see Drug Abuse and Dependence (9.3) ] .

9.3 Dependence

Tolerance is when a patient’s reaction to a specific dosage and concentration is progressively reduced in the absence of disease progression, requiring an increase in the dosage to maintain the same. Physical dependence is characterized by withdrawal symptoms after abrupt discontinuation or a significant dose reduction of a drug. Both tolerance and physical dependence have been reported with the prolonged use of carisoprodol. Reported withdrawal symptoms with carisoprodol include insomnia, vomiting, abdominal cramps, headache, tremors, muscle twitching, anxiety, ataxia, hallucinations, and psychosis. Instruct patients taking large doses of carisoprodol or those taking the drug for a prolonged time to not abruptly stop carisoprodol [ see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) ] .

10 OVERDOSAGE

Overdosage of carisoprodol commonly produces CNS depression. Death, coma, respiratory depression, hypotension, seizures, delirium, hallucinations, dystonic reactions, nystagmus, blurred vision, mydriasis, euphoria, muscular incoordination, rigidity, and/or headache have been reported with carisoprodol overdosage. Serotonin syndrome has been reported with carisoprodol intoxication. Many of the carisoprodol overdoses have occurred in the setting of multiple drug overdoses (including drugs of abuse, illegal drugs, and alcohol). The effects of an overdose of carisoprodol and other CNS depressants (e.g., alcohol, benzodiazepines, opioids, tricyclic antidepressants) can be additive even when one of the drugs has been taken in the recommended dosage. Fatal accidental and non-accidental overdoses of carisoprodol have been reported alone or in combination with CNS depressants.

Treatment of Overdosage: Basic life support measures should be instituted as dictated by the clinical presentation of the carisoprodol overdose. Vomiting should not be induced because of the risk of CNS and respiratory depression, and subsequent aspiration. Circulatory support should be administered with volume infusion and vasopressor agents if needed. Seizures should be treated with intravenous benzodiazepines and the reoccurrence of seizures may be treated with phenobarbital. In cases of severe CNS depression, airway protective reflexes may be compromised and tracheal intubation should be considered for airway protection and respiratory support.

For decontamination in cases of severe toxicity, activated charcoal should be considered in a hospital setting in patients with large overdoses who present early and are not demonstrating CNS depression and can protect their airway.

For more information on the management of an overdose of carisoprodol, contact a Poison Control Center.

11 DESCRIPTION

Carisoprodol tablets USP are available as 350 mg, white tablets. Carisoprodol is a white, crystalline powder, having a mild, characteristic odor and a bitter taste. It is slightly soluble in water; freely soluble in alcohol, in chloroform, and in acetone; and its solubility is practically independent of pH. Carisoprodol is present as a racemic mixture. Chemically, carisoprodol is N-isopropyl-2-methyl-2-propyl-1,3-propanediol dicarbamate and the molecular formula is C 12 H 24 N 2 O 4 , with a molecular weight of 260.33. The structural formula is:

Chemical Structure
(click image for full-size original)

Other ingredients in the Carisoprodol tablets USP drug product include lactose monohydrate, microcrystalline cellulose, maize starch, croscarmellose sodium, povidone, talc, and magnesium stearate.

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