Prescription Drug Information: DEXMEDETOMIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE (Page 3 of 5)

6.2 Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during post approval use of dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

Hypotension and bradycardia were the most common adverse reactions associated with the use of dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection during post approval use of the drug.

Table 7: Adverse Reactions Experienced During Post-approval Use of Dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection

System Organ Class Preferred Term
Blood and Lymphatic System Disorders Anemia
Cardiac Disorders Arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation, atrioventricular block, bradycardia, cardiac arrest, cardiac disorder, extrasystoles, myocardial infarction, supraventricular tachycardia, tachycardia, ventricular arrhythmia, ventricular tachycardia
Eye Disorders Photopsia, visual impairment
Gastrointestinal Disorders Abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting
General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions Chills, hyperpyrexia, pain, pyrexia, thirst
Hepatobiliary Disorders Hepatic function abnormal, hyperbilirubinemia
Investigations Alanine aminotransferase increased, aspartate aminotransferase increased, blood alkaline phosphatase increased, blood urea increased, electrocardiogram T wave inversion, gammaglutamyltransferase increased, electrocardiogram QT prolonged
Metabolism and Nutrition Disorders Acidosis, hyperkalemia, hypoglycemia, hypovolemia, hypernatremia
Nervous System Disorders Convulsion, dizziness, headache, neuralgia, neuritis, speech disorder
Psychiatric Disorders Agitation, confusional state, delirium, hallucination, illusion
Renal and Urinary Disorders Oliguria, polyuria
Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders Apnea, bronchospasm, dyspnea, hypercapnia, hypoventilation, hypoxia, pulmonary congestion, respiratory acidosis
Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders Hyperhidrosis
Surgical and Medical Procedures Light anesthesia
Vascular Disorders Blood pressure fluctuation, hemorrhage, hypertension, hypotension

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

7.1 Anesthetics, Sedatives, Hypnotics, Opioids

Co-administration of dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection with anesthetics, sedatives, hypnotics, and opioids is likely to lead to an enhancement of effects. Specific studies have confirmed these effects with sevoflurane, isoflurane, propofol, alfentanil, and midazolam. No pharmacokinetic interactions between dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection and isoflurane, propofol, alfentanil and midazolam have been demonstrated. However, due to possible pharmacodynamic interactions, when co-administered with dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection, a reduction in dosage of dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection or the concomitant anesthetic, sedative, hypnotic or opioid may be required.

7.2 Neuromuscular Blockers

In one study of 10 healthy adult volunteers, administration of dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection for 45 minutes at a plasma concentration of one ng/mL resulted in no clinically meaningful increases in the magnitude of neuromuscular blockade associated with rocuronium administration.

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category C
There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection use in pregnant women. In an in vitro human placenta study, placental transfer of dexmedetomidine occurred. In a study in the pregnant rat, placental transfer of dexmedetomidine was observed when radiolabeled dexmedetomidine was administered subcutaneously. Thus, fetal exposure should be expected in humans, and dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefits justify the potential risk to the fetus.
Teratogenic effects were not observed in rats following subcutaneous administration of dexmedetomidine during the period of fetal organogenesis (from gestation day 5 to 16) with doses up to 200 mcg/kg (representing a dose approximately equal to the maximum recommended human intravenous dose based on body surface area) or in rabbits following intravenous administration of dexmedetomidine during the period of fetal organogenesis (from gestation day 6 to 18) with doses up to 96 mcg/kg (representing approximately half the human exposure at the maximum recommended dose based on plasma area under the time-curve comparison). However, fetal toxicity, as evidenced by increased post-implantation losses and reduced live pups, was observed in rats at a subcutaneous dose of 200 mcg/kg. The no-effect dose in rats was 20 mcg/kg (representing a dose less than the maximum recommended human intravenous dose based on a body surface area comparison). In another reproductive toxicity study when dexmedetomidine was administered subcutaneously to pregnant rats at 8 and 32 mcg/kg (representing a dose less than the maximum recommended human intravenous dose based on a body surface area comparison) from gestation day 16 through weaning, lower offspring weights were observed. Additionally, when offspring of the 32 mcg/kg group were allowed to mate, elevated fetal and embryocidal toxicity and delayed motor development was observed in second generation offspring.

8.2 Labor & Delivery

The safety of dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection during labor and delivery has not been studied.

8.3 Nursing Mothers

It is not known whether dexmedetomidine hydrochloride is excreted in human milk. Radio-labeled dexmedetomidine administered subcutaneously to lactating female rats was excreted in milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection is administered to a nursing woman.

8.4 Pediatric Use

Safety and efficacy have not been established for Procedural or ICU Sedation in pediatric patients. One assessor-blinded trial in pediatric patients and two open label studies in neonates were conducted to assess efficacy for ICU sedation. These studies did not meet their primary efficacy endpoints and the safety data submitted were insufficient to fully characterize the safety profile of dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection for this patient population. The use of dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection for procedural sedation in pediatric patients has not been evaluated.

8.5 Geriatric Use

Intensive Care Unit Sedation

A total of 729 patients in the clinical studies were 65 years of age and over. A total of 200 patients were 75 years of age and over. In patients greater than 65 years of age, a higher incidence of bradycardia and hypotension was observed following administration of dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. Therefore a dose reduction may be considered in patients over 65 years of age [see Dosage and Administration (2.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

Procedural Sedation
A total of 131 patients in the clinical studies were 65 years of age and over. A total of 47 patients were 75 years of age and over. Hypotension occurred in a higher incidence in dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection-treated patients 65 years or older (72%) and 75 years or older (74%) as compared to patients <65 years (47%). A reduced loading dose of 0.5 mcg/kg given over 10 minutes is recommended and a reduction in the maintenance infusion should be considered for patients greater than 65 years of age.

8.6 Hepatic Impairment

Since dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection clearance decreases with increasing severity of hepatic impairment, dose reduction should be considered in patients with impaired hepatic function [see Dosage and Administration (2.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

9 DRUG ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE

9.1 Controlled Substance

Dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection (dexmedetomidine hydrochloride) is not a controlled substance.

9.3 Dependence

The dependence potential of dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection has not been studied in humans. However, since studies in rodents and primates have demonstrated that dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection exhibits pharmacologic actions similar to those of clonidine, it is possible that dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection may produce a clonidine-like withdrawal syndrome upon abrupt discontinuation [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)].

10 OVERDOSAGE

The tolerability of dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection was studied in one study in which healthy adult subjects were administered doses at and above the recommended dose of 0.2 to 0.7 mcg/kg/hr. The maximum blood concentration achieved in this study was approximately 13 times the upper boundary of the therapeutic range. The most notable effects observed in two subjects who achieved the highest doses were first degree atrioventricular block and second degree heart block. No hemodynamic compromise was noted with the atrioventricular block and the heart block resolved spontaneously within one minute.
Five adult patients received an overdose of dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection in the intensive care unit sedation studies. Two of these patients had no symptoms reported; one patient received a 2 mcg/kg loading dose over 10 minutes (twice the recommended loading dose) and one patient received a maintenance infusion of 0.8 mcg/kg/hr. Two other patients who received a 2 mcg/kg loading dose over 10 minutes, experienced bradycardia and/or hypotension. One patient who received a loading bolus dose of undiluted dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection (19.4 mcg/kg), had cardiac arrest from which he was successfully resuscitated.

11 DESCRIPTION

Dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection is a sterile, nonpyrogenic ready to use solution suitable for intravenous infusion. Dexmedetomidine hydrochloride is the S-enantiomer of medetomidine and is chemically described as (+)-4-(S)-[1-(2,3-dimethylphenyl)ethyl]-1H-imidazole monohydrochloride. Dexmedetomidine hydrochloride has a molecular weight of 236.7 and the empirical formula is C13 H16 N2 • HCl and the structural formula is:

dexmed-structure
(click image for full-size original)

Dexmedetomidine hydrochloride is a white or almost white powder that is freely soluble in water and has a pKa of 7.1. Its partition coefficient in-octanol: water at pH 7.4 is 2.89. Dexmedetomidine hydrochloride in 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection is supplied as a clear, colorless, isotonic solution with a pH of 4.5 to 8.0. Each mL contains 4.72 mcg of dexmedetomidine hydrochloride equivalent to 4 mcg (0.004 mg) of dexmedetomidine, 1 mg of L-Methionine and 9 mg sodium chloride in water and is ready to be used. The solution is preservative-free.

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