Prescription Drug Information: Duloxetine (Page 4 of 9)

6.2 Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during post approval use of duloxetine. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

Adverse reactions reported since market introduction that were temporally related to duloxetine therapy and not mentioned elsewhere in labeling include: acute pancreatitis, anaphylactic reaction, aggression and anger (particularly early in treatment or after treatment discontinuation), angioneurotic edema, angle-closure glaucoma, colitis (microscopic or unspecified), cutaneous vasculitis (sometimes associated with systemic involvement), extrapyramidal disorder, galactorrhea, gynecological bleeding, hallucinations, hyperglycemia, hyperprolactinemia, hypersensitivity, hypertensive crisis, muscle spasm, rash, restless legs syndrome, seizures upon treatment discontinuation, supraventricular arrhythmia, tinnitus (upon treatment discontinuation), trismus, and urticaria.

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

Both CYP1A2 and CYP2D6 are responsible for duloxetine metabolism.

7.1 Inhibitors of CYP1A2

When duloxetine 60 mg was co-administered with fluvoxamine 100 mg, a potent CYP1A2 inhibitor, to male subjects (n=14) duloxetine AUC was increased approximately 6-fold, the C max was increased about 2.5-fold, and duloxetine t 1/2 was increased approximately 3-fold. Other drugs that inhibit CYP1A2 metabolism include cimetidine and quinolone antimicrobials such as ciprofloxacin and enoxacin [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.12)] .

7.2 Inhibitors of CYP2D6

Concomitant use of duloxetine (40 mg once daily) with paroxetine (20 mg once daily) increased the concentration of duloxetine AUC by about 60%, and greater degrees of inhibition are expected with higher doses of paroxetine. Similar effects would be expected with other potent CYP2D6 inhibitors (e.g., fluoxetine, quinidine) [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.12)] .

7.3 Dual Inhibition of CYP1A2 and CYP2D6

Concomitant administration of duloxetine 40 mg twice daily with fluvoxamine 100 mg, a potent CYP1A2 inhibitor, to CYP2D6 poor metabolizer subjects (n=14) resulted in a 6-fold increase in duloxetine AUC and C max .

7.4 Drugs that Interfere with Hemostasis (e.g., NSAIDs, Aspirin, and Warfarin)

Serotonin release by platelets plays an important role in hemostasis. Epidemiological studies of the case-control and cohort design that have demonstrated an association between use of psychotropic drugs that interfere with serotonin reuptake and the occurrence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding have also shown that concurrent use of an NSAID or aspirin may potentiate this risk of bleeding. Altered anticoagulant effects, including increased bleeding, have been reported when SSRIs or SNRIs are co-administered with warfarin. Concomitant administration of warfarin (2 to 9 mg once daily) under steady state conditions with duloxetine 60 or 120 mg once daily for up to 14 days in healthy subjects (n=15) did not significantly change INR from baseline (mean INR changes ranged from 0.05 to +0.07). The total warfarin (protein bound plus free drug) pharmacokinetics (AUC T,ss, C max,ss or t max,ss ) for both R- and S-warfarin were not altered by duloxetine. Because of the potential effect of duloxetine on platelets, patients receiving warfarin therapy should be carefully monitored when duloxetine is initiated or discontinued [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.5)] .

7.5 Lorazepam

Under steady-state conditions for duloxetine (60 mg Q 12 hours) and lorazepam (2 mg Q 12 hours), the pharmacokinetics of duloxetine were not affected by co-administration.

7.6 Temazepam

Under steady-state conditions for duloxetine (20 mg qhs) and temazepam (30 mg qhs), the pharmacokinetics of duloxetine were not affected by co-administration.

7.7 Drugs that Affect Gastric Acidity

Duloxetine has an enteric coating that resists dissolution until reaching a segment of the gastrointestinal tract where the pH exceeds 5.5. In extremely acidic conditions, duloxetine, unprotected by the enteric coating, may undergo hydrolysis to form naphthol. Caution is advised in using duloxetine in patients with conditions that may slow gastric emptying (e.g., some diabetics). Drugs that raise the gastrointestinal pH may lead to an earlier release of duloxetine. However, co-administration of duloxetine with aluminum- and magnesium-containing antacids (51 mEq) or duloxetine with famotidine, had no significant effect on the rate or extent of duloxetine absorption after administration of a 40 mg oral dose. It is unknown whether the concomitant administration of proton pump inhibitors affects duloxetine absorption [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.14)] .

7.8 Drugs Metabolized by CYP1A2

In vitro drug interaction studies demonstrate that duloxetine does not induce CYP1A2 activity. Therefore, an increase in the metabolism of CYP1A2 substrates (e.g., theophylline, caffeine) resulting from induction is not anticipated, although clinical studies of induction have not been performed. Duloxetine is an inhibitor of the CYP1A2 isoform in in vitro studies, and in two clinical studies the average (90% confidence interval) increase in theophylline AUC was 7% (1%-15%) and 20% (13%-27%) when co-administered with duloxetine (60 mg twice daily).

7.9 Drugs Metabolized by CYP2D6

Duloxetine is a moderate inhibitor of CYP2D6. When duloxetine was administered (at a dose of 60 mg twice daily) in conjunction with a single 50 mg dose of desipramine, a CYP2D6 substrate, the AUC of desipramine increased 3-fold [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.12)] .

7.10 Drugs Metabolized by CYP2C9

Results of in vitro studies demonstrate that duloxetine does not inhibit activity. In a clinical study, the pharmacokinetics of S-warfarin, a CYP2C9 substrate, were not significantly affected by duloxetine [see Drug Interactions ( 7.4)] .

7.11 Drugs Metabolized by CYP3A

Results of in vitro studies demonstrate that duloxetine does not inhibit or induce CYP3A activity. Therefore, an increase or decrease in the metabolism of CYP3A substrates (e.g., oral contraceptives and other steroidal agents) resulting from induction or inhibition is not anticipated, although clinical studies have not been performed.

7.12 Drugs Metabolized by CYP2C19

Results of in vitro studies demonstrate that duloxetine does not inhibit CYP2C19 activity at therapeutic concentrations. Inhibition of the metabolism of CYP2C19 substrates is therefore not anticipated, although clinical studies have not been performed.

7.13 Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs)

[See Dosage and Administration ( 2.9, 2.10), Contraindications ( 4), and Warnings and Precautions ( 5.4)] .

7.14 Serotonergic Drugs

[See Dosage and Administration ( 2.9, 2.10), Contraindications ( 4), and Warnings and Precautions ( 5.4)].

7.15 Alcohol

When duloxetine and ethanol were administered several hours apart so that peak concentrations of each would coincide, duloxetine did not increase the impairment of mental and motor skills caused by alcohol.

In the duloxetine clinical trials database, three duloxetine-treated patients had liver injury as manifested by ALT and total bilirubin elevations, with evidence of obstruction. Substantial intercurrent ethanol use was present in each of these cases, and this may have contributed to the abnormalities seen [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.2, 5.12)] .

7.16 CNS Drugs

[See Warnings and Precautions ( 5.12)] .

7.17 Drugs Highly Bound to Plasma Protein

Because duloxetine is highly bound to plasma protein, administration of duloxetine to a patient taking another drug that is highly protein bound may cause increased free concentrations of the other drug, potentially resulting in adverse reactions. However, co-administration of duloxetine (60 or 120 mg) with warfarin (2 to 9 mg), a highly protein-bound drug, did not result in significant changes in INR and in the pharmacokinetics of either total S-or total R-warfarin (protein bound plus free drug) [see Drug Interactions ( 7.4)] .

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

Data from a postmarketing retrospective cohort study indicate that use of duloxetine in the month before delivery may be associated with an increased risk of postpartum hemorrhage. Data from published literature and from a postmarketing retrospective cohort study have not identified a clear drug-associated risk of major birth defects or other adverse developmental outcomes (see Data). There are risks associated with untreated depression and fibromyalgia in pregnancy, and with exposure to SNRIs and SSRIs, including duloxetine, during pregnancy (see Clinical Considerations).

In rats and rabbits treated with duloxetine during the period of organogenesis, fetal weights were decreased but there was no evidence of developmental effects at doses up to 3 and 6 times, respectively, the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of 120 mg/day given to adolescents on a mg/m 2 basis. When duloxetine was administered orally to pregnant rats throughout gestation and lactation, pup weights at birth and pup survival to 1 day postpartum were decreased at a dose 2 times the MRHD given to adolescents on a mg/m 2 basis. At this dose, pup behaviors consistent with increased reactivity, such as increased startle response to noise and decreased habituation of locomotor activity were observed. Post-weaning growth was not adversely affected.

The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2 to 4% and 15 to 20%, respectively.

Clinical Considerations

Disease-associated Maternal and/or Embryo/Fetal Risk

Women who discontinue antidepressants during pregnancy are more likely to experience a relapse of major depression than women who continue antidepressants. This finding is from a prospective, longitudinal study that followed 201 pregnant women with a history of major depressive disorder who were euthymic and taking antidepressants at the beginning of pregnancy. Consider the risk of untreated depression when discontinuing or changing treatment with antidepressant medication during pregnancy and postpartum.

Pregnant women with fibromyalgia are at increased risk for adverse maternal and infant outcomes including preterm premature rupture of membranes, preterm birth, small for gestational age, intrauterine growth restriction, placental disruption, and venous thrombosis. It is not known if these adverse maternal and fetal outcomes are a direct result of fibromyalgia or other comorbid factors.

Maternal Adverse Reactions

Use of duloxetine in the month before delivery may be associated with an increased risk of postpartum hemorrhage [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.5)].

Fetal/Neonatal Adverse Reaction

Neonates exposed to duloxetine and other SNRIs or SSRIs late in the third trimester have developed complications requiring prolonged hospitalization, respiratory support, and tube feeding. Such complications can arise immediately upon delivery. Reported clinical findings have included respiratory distress, cyanosis, apnea, seizures, temperature instability, feeding difficulty, vomiting, hypoglycemia, hypotonia, hypertonia, hyperreflexia, tremor, jitteriness, irritability, and constant crying. These findings are consistent with either a direct toxic effect of the SNRIs or SSRIs, or possibly, a drug discontinuation syndrome. It should be noted that, in some cases, the clinical picture is consistent with serotonin syndrome [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.4)] .

Data

Human Data

Data from a postmarketing retrospective claims-based cohort study found an increased risk for postpartum hemorrhage among 955 pregnant women exposed to duloxetine in the last month of pregnancy compared to 4,128,460 unexposed pregnant women (adjusted relative risk: 1.53; 95% CI: 1.08-2.18). The same study did not find a clinically meaningful increase in the risk for major birth defects in the comparison of 2532 women exposed to duloxetine in the first trimester of pregnancy to 1,284,827 unexposed women after adjusting for several confounders. Methodologic limitations include possible residual confounding, misclassification of exposure and outcomes, lack of direct measures of disease severity, and lack of information about alcohol use, nutrition, and over-the-counter medication exposures.

Animal Data

In animal reproduction studies, duloxetine has been shown to have adverse effects on embryo/fetal and postnatal development.

When duloxetine was administered orally to pregnant rats and rabbits during the period of organogenesis, there was no evidence of malformations or developmental variations at doses up to 45 mg/kg/day [3 and 6 times, respectively, the MRHD of 120 mg/day given to adolescents on a mg/m 2 basis]. However, fetal weights were decreased at this dose, with a no-effect dose of 10 mg/kg/day (approximately equal to the MRHD in rats and 2 times the MRHD in rabbits).

When duloxetine was administered orally to pregnant rats throughout gestation and lactation, the survival of pups to 1 day postpartum and pup body weights at birth and during the lactation period were decreased at a dose of 30 mg/kg/day (2 times the MRHD given to adolescents on a mg/m 2 basis); the no-effect dose was 10 mg/kg/day. Furthermore, behaviors consistent with increased reactivity, such as increased startle response to noise and decreased habituation of locomotor activity, were observed in pups following maternal exposure to 30 mg/kg/day. Post-weaning growth and reproductive performance of the progeny were not affected adversely by maternal duloxetine treatment.

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