Prescription Drug Information: Meloxicam (Page 5 of 6)

13 NONCLINICAL TOXICOLOGY

13.1 Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Carcinogenesis

There was no increase in tumor incidence in long-term carcinogenicity studies in rats (104 weeks) and mice (99 weeks) administered meloxicam at oral doses up to 0.8 mg/kg/day in rats and up to 8.0 mg/kg/day in mice (up to 0.5-and 2.6-times, respectively, the maximum recommended human dose [MRHD] of 15 mg/day Meloxicam based on body surface area [BSA] comparison).

Mutagenesis

Meloxicam was not mutagenic in an Ames assay, or clastogenic in a chromosome aberration assay with human lymphocytes and an in vivo micronucleus test in mouse bone marrow.

Impairment of Fertility

Meloxicam did not impair male and female fertility in rats at oral doses up to 9 mg/kg/day in males and 5 mg/kg/day in females (up to 5.8- and 3.2-times greater, respectively, than the MRHD based on BSA comparison).

14 CLINICAL STUDIES

14.1 Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

The use of Meloxicam for the treatment of the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis of the knee and hip was evaluated in a 12-week, double-blind, controlled trial. Meloxicam (3.75 mg, 7.5 mg, and 15 mg daily) was compared to placebo. The four primary endpoints were investigator’s global assessment, patient global assessment, patient pain assessment, and total WOMAC score (a self-administered questionnaire addressing pain, function, and stiffness). Patients on Meloxicam 7.5 mg daily and Meloxicam 15 mg daily showed significant improvement in each of these endpoints compared with placebo.

The use of Meloxicam for the management of signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis was evaluated in six double-blind, active-controlled trials outside the U.S. ranging from 4 weeks’ to 6 months’ duration. In these trials, the efficacy of Meloxicam, in doses of 7.5 mg/day and 15 mg/day, was comparable to piroxicam 20 mg/day and diclofenac SR 100 mg/day and consistent with the efficacy seen in the U.S. trial.

The use of Meloxicam for the treatment of the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis was evaluated in a 12-week, double-blind, controlled multinational trial. Meloxicam (7.5 mg, 15 mg, and 22.5 mg daily) was compared to placebo. The primary endpoint in this study was the ACR20 response rate, a composite measure of clinical, laboratory, and functional measures of RA response. Patients receiving Meloxicam 7.5 mg and 15 mg daily showed significant improvement in the primary endpoint compared with placebo. No incremental benefit was observed with the 22.5 mg dose compared to the 15 mg dose.

14.2 Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) Pauciarticular and Polyarticular Course

The use of Meloxicam for the treatment of the signs and symptoms of pauciarticular or polyarticular course Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis in patients 2 years of age and older was evaluated in two 12-week, double-blind, parallel-arm, active-controlled trials.

Both studies included three arms: naproxen and two doses of meloxicam. In both studies, meloxicam dosing began at 0.125 mg/kg/day (7.5 mg maximum) or 0.25 mg/kg/day (15 mg maximum), and naproxen dosing began at 10 mg/kg/day. One study used these doses throughout the 12-week dosing period, while the other incorporated a titration after 4 weeks to doses of 0.25 mg/kg/day and 0.375 mg/kg/day (22.5 mg maximum) of meloxicam and 15 mg/kg/day of naproxen.

The efficacy analysis used the ACR Pediatric 30 responder definition, a composite of parent and investigator assessments, counts of active joints and joints with limited range of motion, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The proportion of responders were similar in all three groups in both studies, and no difference was observed between the meloxicam dose groups.

16 HOW SUPPLIED/STORAGE AND HANDLING

Meloxicam tablets USP are available as a light yellow, round, flat, uncoated tablet containing meloxicam 7.5 mg or as light yellow, oblong, biconvex, uncoated tablet containing meloxicam 15 mg. The 7.5 mg tablet is impressed with letter U and L on one side and tablet code 7.5 on the other side. The 15 mg tablet is impressed with letter U and L on one side and tablet code 15 on the other side.

Meloxicam Tablets USP 7.5 mg are available as follows:

NDC 29300-124-13; Bottles of 30

NDC 29300-124-01; Bottles of 100

NDC 29300-124-10; Bottles of 1,000

NDC 29300-124-50; Bottles of 5,000

Meloxicam Tablets USP 15 mg are available as follows:

NDC 29300-125-13; Bottles of 30

NDC 29300-125-01; Bottles of 100

NDC 29300-125-10; Bottles of 1,000

NDC 29300-125-50; Bottles of 5,000

Storage Store at 20 0 to 25 0 C (68 0 to 77 0 F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Keep Meloxicam Tablets USP in a dry place

Dispense tablets in a tight container.

Keep this and all medications out of the reach of children.

17 PATIENT COUNSELING INFORMATION

Advise the patient to read the FDA-approved patient labeling (Medication Guide) that accompanies each prescription dispensed.

Additional Medication Guides can be obtained by calling Unichem at 1-866-562-4616.

Inform patients, families or their caregivers of the following information before initiating therapy with an NSAID and periodically during the course of ongoing therapy.

Cardiovascular Thrombotic Events

Advise patients to be alert for the symptoms of cardiovascular thrombotic events, including chest pain, shortness of breath, weakness, or slurring of speech, and to report any of these symptoms to their healthcare provider immediately [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.1)].

Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Ulceration, and Perforation

Advise patients to report symptoms of ulcerations and bleeding, including epigastric pain, dyspepsia, melena, and hematemesis to their healthcare provider. In the setting of concomitant use of low-dose aspirin for cardiac prophylaxis, inform patients of the increased risk for the signs and symptoms of GI bleeding [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.2)].

Hepatotoxicity

Inform patients of the warning signs and symptoms of hepatotoxicity (e.g., nausea, fatigue, lethargy, diarrhea, pruritus, jaundice, right upper quadrant tenderness, and “flu-like” symptoms). If these occur, instruct patients to stop Meloxicam tablets and seek immediate medical therapy [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.3) ].

Heart Failure and Edema

Advise patients to be alert for the symptoms of congestive heart failure including shortness of breath, unexplained weight gain, or edema and to contact their healthcare provider if such symptoms occur [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.5) ].

Anaphylactic Reactions

Inform patients of the signs of an anaphylactic reaction (e.g., difficulty breathing, swelling of the face or throat). Instruct patients to seek immediate emergency help if these occur [ see Contraindications ( 4) and Warnings and Precautions ( 5.7) ].

Serious Skin Reactions

Advise patients to stop Meloxicam tablets immediately if they develop any type of rash and to contact their healthcare provider as soon as possible [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.9) ].

Female Fertility

Advise females of reproductive potential who desire pregnancy that NSAIDs, including Meloxicam tablets, may be associated with a reversible delay in ovulation [ see Use in Specific Populations ( 8.3) ].

Fetal Toxicity

Inform pregnant women to avoid use of Meloxicam tablets and other NSAIDs starting at 30 weeks gestation because of the risk of the premature closing of the fetal ductus arteriosus [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.10) and Use in Specific Populations ( 8.1) ].

Avoid Concomitant Use of NSAIDs

Inform patients that the concomitant use of Meloxicam tablets with other NSAIDs or salicylates (e.g., diflunisal, salsalate) is not recommended due to the increased risk of gastrointestinal toxicity, and little or no increase in efficacy [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.2) and Drug Interactions ( 7) ]. Alert patients that NSAIDs may be present in “over the counter” medications for treatment of colds, fever, or insomnia.

Use of NSAIDs and Low-Dose Aspirin

Inform patients not to use low-dose aspirin concomitantly with Meloxicam tablets until they talk to their healthcare provider [ see Drug Interactions ( 7) ].

For current prescribing information, call Unichem at 1-866-562-4616.

Manufactured by:

UNICHEM LABORATORIES LTD.

Pilerne Ind. Estate,

Pilerne, Bardez, Goa 403511, India

Manufactured for:

Unichem Logo

Hasbrouck Heights, NJ 07604

07-R-09/2017

13009858

SPL MEDGUIDE

Medication Guide for Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)
What is the most important information I should know about medicines called Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)? NSAIDs can cause serious side effects, including: • Increased risk of a heart attack or stroke that can lead to death. This risk may happen early in treatment and may increase: o with increasing doses of NSAIDs o with longer use of NSAIDs • Do not take NSAIDs right before or after a heart surgery called a “coronary artery bypass graft (CABG).” • Avoid taking NSAIDs after a recent heart attack, unless your healthcare provider tells you to. You may have an increased risk of another heart attack if you take NSAIDs after a recent heart attack. • Increased risk of bleeding, ulcers, and tears (perforation) of the esophagus (tube leading from the mouth to the stomach), stomach and intestines: o anytime during use o without warning symptoms o that may cause death The risk of getting an ulcer or bleeding increases with: o past history of stomach ulcers, or stomach or intestinal bleeding with use of NSAIDs o taking medicines called “corticosteroids”, “anticoagulants”, “SSRIs”, or “SNRIs” o increasing doses of NSAIDs o longer use of NSAIDs o smoking o drinking alcohol o older age o poor health o advanced liver disease o bleeding problems NSAIDs should only be used: o exactly as prescribed o at the lowest dose possible for your treatment o for the shortest time needed
What are NSAIDs? NSAIDs are used to treat pain and redness, swelling, and heat (inflammation) from medical conditions such as different types of arthritis, menstrual cramps, and other types of short-term pain.
Who should not take NSAIDs? Do not take NSAIDs: if you have had an asthma attack, hives, or other allergic reaction with aspirin or any other NSAIDs. right before or after heart bypass surgery.
Before taking NSAIDs, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you: have liver or kidney problems have high blood pressure have asthma are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Talk to your healthcare provider if you are considering taking NSAIDs during pregnancy. You should not take NSAIDs after 29 weeks of pregnancy. are breastfeeding or plan to breast feed. Tell your healthcare provider about all of the medicines you take, including prescription or over-the-counter medicines, vitamins or herbal supplements. NSAIDs and some other medicines can interact with each other and cause serious side effects. Do not start taking any new medicine without talking to your healthcare provider first.
What are the possible side effects of NSAIDs? NSAIDs can cause serious side effects, including: See “What is the most important information I should know about medicines called Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)?” new or worse high blood pressure heart failure liver problems including liver failure kidney problems including kidney failure low red blood cells (anemia) life-threatening skin reactions life-threatening allergic reactions • Other side effects of NSAIDs include: stomach pain, constipation, diarrhea, gas, heartburn, nausea, vomiting, and dizziness. Get emergency help right away if you get any of the following symptoms: shortness of breath or trouble breathing chest pain weakness in one part or side of your body slurred speech swelling of the face or throat Stop taking your NSAID and call your healthcare provider right away if you get any of the following symptoms: Nausea more tired or weaker than usual diarrhea itching your skin or eyes look yellow indigestion or stomach pain flu-like symptoms vomit blood there is blood in your bowel movement or it is black and sticky like tar unusual weight gain skin rash or blisters with fever swelling of the arms, legs, hands and feet If you take too much of your NSAID, call your healthcare provider or get medical help right away. These are not all the possible side effects of NSAIDs. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist about NSAIDs. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.
Other information about NSAIDs: Aspirin is an NSAID but it does not increase the chance of a heart attack. Aspirin can cause bleeding in the brain, stomach, and intestines. Aspirin can also cause ulcers in the stomach and intestines. Some NSAIDs are sold in lower doses without a prescription (over-the-counter). Talk to your healthcare provider before using over-the-counter NSAIDs for more than 10 days.
General information about the safe and effective use of NSAIDs Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Medication Guide. Do not use NSAIDs for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give NSAIDs to other people, even if they have the same symptoms that you have. It may harm them. If you would like more information about NSAIDs, talk with your healthcare provider. You can ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider for information about NSAIDs that is written for health professionals.
Additional Medication Guides can be obtained by calling Unichem at 1-866-562-4616. The other trademarks referenced are owned by third parties not affiliated with Unichem Laboratories Limited Manufactured by: UNICHEM LABORATORIES LTD. Pilerne Ind. Estate, Pilerne, Bardez, Goa 403511, India Manufactured for: Image Hasbrouck Heights, NJ 07604 06-R-09/2017 13009858

This Medication Guide has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Revised: September 2017

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