Prescription Drug Information: Meloxicam

MELOXICAM- meloxicam tablet
PD-Rx Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

WARNING: RISK OF SERIOUS CARDIOVASCULAR and GASTROINTESTINAL EVENTS

Cardiovascular Risk

  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may cause an increased risk of serious cardiovascular (CV) thrombotic events, myocardial infarction, and stroke, which can be fatal. This risk may increase with duration of use. Patients with cardiovascular disease or risk factors for cardiovascular disease may be at greater risk [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.1)].
  • Meloxicam is contraindicated for the treatment of peri-operative pain in the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery [ see Contraindications ( 4.2) and Warnings and Precautions ( 5.1) ].

Gastrointestinal Risk

  • NSAIDs cause an increased risk of serious gastrointestinal (GI) adverse reactions including bleeding, ulceration, and perforation of the stomach or intestines, which can be fatal. These events can occur at any time during use and without warning symptoms. Elderly patients are at greater risk for serious gastrointestinal events [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.2) ].

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE

1.1 Osteoarthritis (OA)

Meloxicam tablets, USP is indicated for relief of the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis [ see Clinical Studies ( 14.1) ].

1.2 Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

Meloxicam tablets, USP is indicated for relief of the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis [ see Clinical Studies ( 14.1) ].

1.3 Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) Pauciarticular and Polyarticular Course

Meloxicam tablets, USP is indicated for relief of the signs and symptoms of pauciarticular or polyarticular course Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis in patients 2 years of age and older [ see Clinical Studies ( 14.2) ].

2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

2.1 General Instructions

Carefully consider the potential benefits and risks of meloxicam and other treatment options before deciding to use meloxicam. Use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration consistent with individual patient treatment goals [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.4) ].

After observing the response to initial therapy with meloxicam, adjust the dose to suit an individual patient’s needs.

In adults, the maximum recommended daily oral dose of meloxicam is 15 mg regardless of formulation. In patients with hemodialysis, a maximum daily dosage of 7.5 mg is recommended [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.6), Use in Specific Populations ( 8.7), and Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.3) ].

Meloxicam may be taken without regard to timing of meals.

2.2 Osteoarthritis

For the relief of the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis the recommended starting and maintenance oral dose of meloxicam is 7.5 mg once daily. Some patients may receive additional benefit by increasing the dose to 15 mg once daily.

2.3 Rheumatoid Arthritis

For the relief of the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, the recommended starting and maintenance oral dose of meloxicam is 7.5 mg once daily. Some patients may receive additional benefit by increasing the dose to 15 mg once daily.

3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

Tablets:

  • 7.5 mg: pastel yellow, round, biconvex, uncoated tablet containing meloxicam 7.5 mg. The 7.5 mg tablet is impressed with “5” mark on one side.
  • 15 mg: pastel yellow, round, biconvex, uncoated tablet containing meloxicam 15 mg. The 15 mg tablet is impressed with “100” mark on one side.

4 CONTRAINDICATIONS

4.1 Allergic Reactions

Meloxicam is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity (e.g., anaphylactoid reactions and serious skin reactions) to meloxicam.

Meloxicam should not be given to patients who have experienced asthma, urticaria, or allergic-type reactions after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs. Severe, rarely fatal, anaphylactic-like reactions to NSAIDs have been reported in such patients [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.7, 5.13) ].

4.2 Coronary Surgery

Meloxicam is contraindicated for the treatment of peri-operative pain in the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.1) ].

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

5.1 Cardiovascular Thrombotic Events

Clinical trials of several COX-2 selective and nonselective NSAIDs of up to three years’ duration have shown an increased risk of serious cardiovascular (CV) thrombotic events, myocardial infarction, and stroke, which can be fatal. All NSAIDs, both COX-2 selective and nonselective, may have a similar risk. Patients with known CV disease or risk factors for CV disease may be at greater risk. To minimize the potential risk for an adverse CV event in patients treated with an NSAID, the lowest effective dose should be used for the shortest duration possible. Physicians and patients should remain alert for the development of such events, even in the absence of previous CV symptoms. Patients should be informed about the signs and/or symptoms of serious CV events and the steps to take if they occur.

Two large, controlled, clinical trials of a COX-2 selective NSAID for the treatment of pain in the first 10 to 14 days following CABG surgery found an increased incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke [ see Contraindications ( 4.2) ].

There is no consistent evidence that concurrent use of aspirin mitigates the increased risk of serious CV thrombotic events associated with NSAID use. The concurrent use of aspirin and an NSAID does increase the risk of serious GI events [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.2) ].

5.2 Gastrointestinal (GI) Effects — Risk of GI Ulceration, Bleeding, and Perforation

NSAIDs, including meloxicam, can cause serious gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events including inflammation, bleeding, ulceration, and perforation of the stomach, small intestine, or large intestine, which can be fatal. These serious adverse events can occur at any time, with or without warning symptoms, in patients treated with NSAIDs. Only one in five patients who develop a serious upper GI adverse event on NSAID therapy is symptomatic. Upper GI ulcers, gross bleeding, or perforation caused by NSAIDs, occur in approximately 1% of patients treated for 3 to 6 months, and in about 2 to 4% of patients treated for one year. These trends continue with longer duration of use, increasing the likelihood of developing a serious GI event at some time during the course of therapy. However, even short-term therapy is not without risk.

Prescribe NSAIDs, including meloxicam, with extreme caution in those with a prior history of ulcer disease or gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients with a prior history of peptic ulcer disease and/or gastrointestinal bleeding who use NSAIDs have a greater than 10-fold increased risk for developing a GI bleed compared to patients with neither of these risk factors. Other factors that increase the risk for GI bleeding in patients treated with NSAIDs include concomitant use of oral corticosteroids or anticoagulants, longer duration of NSAID therapy, smoking, use of alcohol, older age, and poor general health status. Most spontaneous reports of fatal GI events are in elderly or debilitated patients and therefore, special care should be taken in treating this population.

To minimize the potential risk for an adverse GI event in patients treated with an NSAID, use the lowest effective dose for the shortest possible duration. Patients and physicians should remain alert for signs and symptoms of GI ulceration and bleeding during meloxicam therapy and promptly initiate additional evaluation and treatment if a serious GI adverse event is suspected. This should include discontinuation of meloxicam until a serious GI adverse event is ruled out. For high-risk patients, consider alternate therapies that do not involve NSAIDs.

5.3 Hepatic Effects

Borderline elevations of one or more liver tests may occur in up to 15% of patients taking NSAIDs including meloxicam. These laboratory abnormalities may progress, may remain unchanged, or may be transient with continuing therapy. Notable elevations of ALT or AST (approximately three or more times the upper limit of normal) have been reported in approximately 1% of patients in clinical trials with NSAIDs. In addition, rare cases of severe hepatic reactions, including jaundice and fatal fulminant hepatitis, liver necrosis and hepatic failure, some of them with fatal outcomes have been reported [ see Adverse Reactions ( 6.1) ].

A patient with symptoms and/or signs suggesting liver dysfunction, or in whom an abnormal liver test has occurred, should be evaluated for evidence of the development of a more severe hepatic reaction while on therapy with meloxicam. If clinical signs and symptoms consistent with liver disease develop, or if systemic manifestations occur (e.g., eosinophilia, rash, etc.), discontinue meloxicam [ see Use in Specific Populations ( 8.6) and Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.3) ].

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