Prescription Drug Information: Mirtazapine (Page 3 of 6)

6.2 Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of mirtazapine. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

Cardiac disorders: ventricular arrhythmia (Torsades de Pointes)

Endocrine disorders: hyperprolactinemia (and related symptoms, e.g., galactorrhea and gynecomastia)

Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders: increased creatine kinase blood levels and rhabdomyolysis

Psychiatric disorders: somnambulism (ambulation and other complex behaviors out of bed)

Reproductive system and breast disorders: priapism
Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders: severe skin reactions, including DRESS, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, bullous dermatitis, erythema multiforme and toxic epidermal necrolysis

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

Table 5 includes clinically important drug interactions with mirtazapine [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

Table 5: Clinically Important Drug Interactions with Mirtazapine
Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs)
Clinical Impact The concomitant use of serotonergic drugs, including mirtazapine, and MAOIs increases the risk of serotonin syndrome.
Intervention Mirtazapine is contraindicated in patients taking MAOIs, including MAOIs such as linezolid or intravenous methylene blue [see Dosage and Administration (2.4), Contraindications (4), Warnings and Precautions (5.3)].
Examples selegiline, tranylcypromine, isocarboxazid, phenelzine, linezolid, methylene blue
Other Serotonergic Drugs
Clinical Impact The concomitant use of serotonergic drugs with mirtazapine increases the risk of serotonin syndrome.
Intervention Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of serotonin syndrome, particularly during treatment initiation and dosage increases. If serotonin syndrome occurs, consider discontinuation of mirtazapine and/or concomitant serotonergic drugs [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)].
Examples SSRIs, SNRIs, triptans, tricyclic antidepressants, fentanyl, lithium, amphetamines, St. John’s Wort, tramadol, tryptophan, buspirone
Strong CYP3A Inducers
Clinical Impact The concomitant use of strong CYP3A inducers with mirtazapine decreases the plasma concentration of mirtazapine [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].
Intervention Increase the dose of mirtazapine if needed with concomitant CYP3A inducer use. Conversely, a decrease in dosage of mirtazapine may be needed if the CYP3A inducer is discontinued [see Dosage and Administration (2.5)].
Examples phenytoin, carbamazepine, rifampin
Strong CYP3A Inhibitors
Clinical Impact The concomitant use of strong CYP3A inhibitors with mirtazapine may increase the plasma concentration of mirtazapine [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].
Intervention Decrease the dose of mirtazapine if needed with concomitant strong CYP3A inhibitor use. Conversely, an increase in dosage of mirtazapine may be needed if the CYP3A inhibitor is discontinued [see Dosage and Administration (2.5)].
Examples itraconazole, ritonavir, nefazodone
Cimetidine
Clinical Impact The concomitant use of cimetidine, a CYP1A2, CYP2D6, and CYP3A inhibitor, with mirtazapine may increase the plasma concentration of mirtazapine [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].
Intervention Decrease the dose of mirtazapine if needed with concomitant cimetidine use. Conversely, an increase in dosage of mirtazapine may be needed if cimetidine is discontinued [see Dosage and Administration (2.5)].
Benzodiazepines and Alcohol
Clinical Impact The concomitant use of benzodiazepines or alcohol with mirtazapine increases the impairment of cognitive and motor skills produced by mirtazapine alone.
Intervention Avoid concomitant use of benzodiazepines and alcohol with mirtazapine [see Warnings and Precautions (5.8), Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].
Examples diazepam, alprazolam, alcohol
Drugs that Prolong QTc Interval
Clinical Impact The concomitant use of other drugs which prolong the QTc interval with mirtazapine, increase the risk of QT prolongation and/or ventricular arrhythmias (e.g., Torsades de Pointes).
Intervention Use caution when using mirtazapine concomitantly with drugs that prolong the QTc interval [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5), Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].
Warfarin
Clinical Impact The concomitant use of warfarin with mirtazapine may result in an increase in INR [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].
Intervention Monitor INR during concomitant use of warfarin with mirtazapine.

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Pregnancy Exposure Registry

There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to antidepressants during pregnancy. Healthcare providers are encouraged to register patients by calling the National Pregnancy Registry for Antidepressants at 1-844-405-6185 or visiting online at https://womensmentalhealth.org/clinical-and-research-programs/pregnancyregistry/antidepressants/.

Risk Summary

Prolonged experience with mirtazapine in pregnant women, based on published observational studies and postmarketing reports, has not reliably identified a drug-associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage or adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. There are risks associated with untreated depression in pregnancy (see Clinical Considerations).

In animal reproduction studies, oral administration of mirtazpine to pregnant rats and rabbits during the period of organogenesis revealed no evidence of teratogenic effects up to 20 and 17 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of 45 mg, respectively, based on mg/m2 body surface area. However, in rats, there was an increase in postimplantation loss at 20 times the MRHD based on mg/m2 body surface area. Oral administration of mirtazapine to pregnant rats during pregnancy and lactation resulted in an increase in pup deaths and a decrease in pup birth weights at doses 20 times the MRHD based on mg/m2 body surface area (see Data).

The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2 to 4% and 15 to 20%, respectively.

Clinical Considerations

Disease-Associated Maternal and/or Embryo/Fetal Risk

Women who discontinue antidepressants during pregnancy are more likely to experience a relapse of major depression than women who continue antidepressants. This finding is from a prospective, longitudinal study that followed 201 pregnant women with a history of major depressive disorder who were euthymic and taking antidepressants at the beginning of pregnancy. Consider the risk of untreated depression when discontinuing or changing treatment with antidepressant medication during pregnancy and postpartum.

Data

Animal Data

Mirtazapine was administered orally to pregnant rats and rabbits during the period of organogenesis at doses of 2.5, 15, and 100 mg/kg/day and 2.5, 10, and 40 mg/kg/day, respectively, which are up to 20 and 17 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of 45 mg based on mg/m2 body surface area, respectively. No evidence of teratogenic effects was observed. However, in rats, there was an increase in postimplantation loss in dams treated with mirtazapine at 100 mg/kg/day which is 20 times the MRHD based on mg/m2 body surface area. Oral administration of mirtazapine at doses of 2.5, 15, and 100 mg/kg/day to pregnant rats during pregnancy and lactation resulted in an increase in pup deaths during the first 3 days of lactation and a decrease in pup birth weights at 20 times the MRHD based on mg/m2 body surface area. The cause of these deaths is not known. The no effect dose level is 3 times the MRHD based on mg/m2 body surface area.

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

Data from published literature report the presence of mirtazapine in human milk at low levels with relative infant doses for mirtazapine ranging between 0.6 and 2.8% of the maternal weight-adjusted dose (see Data). No adverse effects on the breastfed infant have been reported in most cases of maternal use of mirtazapine. There are no data on the effects of mirtazapine on milk production.

The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for mirtazapine and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from mirtazapine or from the underlying maternal condition.

Data

In a published pooled analysis of 8 breastfeeding mother-infant pairs, the mean (min, max) total relative infant doses for mirtazapine and its desmethyl metabolite were 1.5% (0.6%, 2.8%) and 0.4% (0.1%, 0.7%) of the maternal weight-adjusted dose (median (min, max) dose of 38 mg (30 mg, 120 mg), respectively). No adverse drug effects were reported for any of the infants.

8.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of mirtazapine have not been established in pediatric patients with MDD. Two placebo-controlled trials in 258 pediatric patients with MDD have been conducted with mirtazapine, and the data were insufficient to establish the safety and effectiveness of mirtazapine in pediatric patients with MDD.

Antidepressants increased the risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in pediatric patients [see Boxed Warning and Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].

In an 8-week-long clinical trial in pediatric patients receiving doses between 15 to 45 mg per day, 49% of mirtazapine-treated patients had a weight gain of at least 7%, compared to 5.7% of placebo-treated patients. The mean increase in weight was 4 kg (2 kg SD) for mirtazapine-treated patients versus 1 kg (2 kg SD) for placebo-treated patients [see Warnings and Precautions (5.7)].

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