Prescription Drug Information: Terbinafine Hydrochloride (Page 2 of 3)

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

7.1 Drug-Drug Interactions

In vivo studies have shown that terbinafine is an inhibitor of the CYP450 2D6 isozyme. Drugs predominantly metabolized by the CYP450 2D6 isozyme include the following drug classes: tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, beta-blockers, antiarrhythmics class 1C (e.g., flecainide and propafenone) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors Type B. Coadministration of terbinafine tablets should be done with careful monitoring and may require a reduction in dose of the 2D6-metabolized drug. In a study to assess the effects of terbinafine on desipramine in healthy volunteers characterized as normal metabolizers, the administration of terbinafine resulted in a 2 fold increase in Cmax and a 5 fold increase in area under the curve (AUC). In this study, these effects were shown to persist at the last observation at 4 weeks after discontinuation of terbinafine tablets. In studies in healthy subjects characterized as extensive metabolizers of dextromethorphan (antitussive drug and CYP2D6 probe substrate), terbinafine increases the dextromethorphan/ dextrorphan metabolite ratio in urine by 16 to 97 fold on average. Thus, terbinafine may convert extensive CYP2D6 metabolizers to poor metabolizer status.

In vitro studies with human liver microsomes showed that terbinafine does not inhibit the metabolism of tolbutamide, ethinylestradiol, ethoxycoumarin, cyclosporine, cisapride and fluvastatin. In vivo drug-drug interaction studies conducted in healthy volunteer subjects showed that terbinafine does not affect the clearance of antipyrine or digoxin. Terbinafine decreases the clearance of caffeine by 19%. Terbinafine increases the clearance of cyclosporine by 15%.

The influence of terbinafine on the pharmacokinetics of fluconazole, cotrimoxazole (trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole), zidovudine or theophylline was not considered to be clinically significant.

Coadministration of a single dose of fluconazole (100 mg) with a single dose of terbinafine resulted in a 52% and 69% increase in terbinafine Cmax and AUC, respectively. Fluconazole is an inhibitor of CYP2C9 and CYP3A enzymes. Based on this finding, it is likely that other inhibitors of both CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 (e.g., ketoconazole, amiodarone) may also lead to a substantial increase in the systemic exposure (Cmax and AUC) of terbinafine when concomitantly administered.

There have been spontaneous reports of increase or decrease in prothrombin times in patients concomitantly taking oral terbinafine and warfarin, however, a causal relationship between terbinafine tablets and these changes has not been established.

Terbinafine clearance is increased 100% by rifampin, a CYP450 enzyme inducer, and decreased 33% by cimetidine, a CYP450 enzyme inhibitor. Terbinafine clearance is unaffected by cyclosporine. There is no information available from adequate drug-drug interaction studies with the following classes of drugs: oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapies, hypoglycemics, phenytoins, thiazide diuretics, and calcium channel blockers.

7.2 Food Interactions

An evaluation of the effect of food on terbinafine tablets was conducted. An increase of less than 20% of the AUC of terbinafine was observed when terbinafine tablets were administered with food. Terbinafine tablets can be taken with or without food.

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

Available data from postmarketing cases on the use of terbinafine tablets in pregnant women are insufficient to evaluate a drug-associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage, or adverse maternal or fetal outcomes.

In animal reproduction studies, terbinafine did not cause malformations or any harm to the fetus when administered to pregnant rabbits and rats during the period of organogenesis at oral doses up to 12 and 23 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of 250 mg/day, respectively (see data).

All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. The background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown; however, in the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects is 2% to 4% and of miscarriage is 15% to 20% of clinically recognized pregnancies.

Data
Animal Data
In embryo-fetal development studies in rats and rabbits, pregnant animals received orally (by gavage) doses of terbinafine up to 300 mg/kg/day, during the period of organogenesis. There were no maternal or embryo-fetal effects in either species up to the maximum dose tested. The 300 mg/kg/day dose level in rats and rabbits corresponds to 23 and 12 times the MRHD [based on body surface area (BSA) comparisons], respectively.

In a rat peri- and postnatal development study, terbinafine doses of up to 300 mg/kg/day (12 times the MRHD based on BSA comparisons) given by oral gavage during late pregnancy and lactation (Day 15 of gestation to day 20 post-partum) had no adverse effects on parturition and lactation.

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary
After oral administration, terbinafine is present in human milk. However, there are no data on the effects on the breastfed child or on milk production. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for terbinafine tablets and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from terbinafine tablets or from the underlying maternal condition.

8.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and efficacy of terbinafine tablets have not been established in pediatric patients with onychomycosis.

8.5 Geriatric Use

Clinical studies of terbinafine tablets did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 years and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy.

8.6 Renal Impairment

In patients with renal impairment (creatinine clearance less than or equal to 50 mL/min), the use of terbinafine tablets has not been adequately studied.

8.7 Hepatic Impairment

Terbinafine tablets are contraindicated for patients with chronic or active liver disease [see Contraindications (4) and Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. Cases of liver failure, some leading to liver transplant or death, have occurred with the use of terbinafine tablets in individuals with and without preexisting liver disease. The severity of hepatic events and/or their outcome may be worse in patients with active or chronic liver disease.

10 OVERDOSAGE

Clinical experience regarding overdose with oral terbinafine is limited. Doses up to 5 grams (20 times the therapeutic daily dose) have been taken without inducing serious adverse reactions. The symptoms of overdose included nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dizziness, rash, frequent urination, and headache.

11 DESCRIPTION

Terbinafine tablets, USP contain the synthetic allylamine antifungal compound terbinafine hydrochloride, USP.

Chemically, terbinafine hydrochloride, USP is (E)-N -(6,6-dimethyl-2-hepten-4-ynyl)-N -methyl-1-naphthalenemethanamine hydrochloride. The empirical formula C21 H26 ClN with a molecular weight of 327.90, and the following structural formula:

structure

Terbinafine hydrochloride, USP is a white to off-white fine crystalline powder. It is freely soluble in methanol and methylene chloride, soluble in ethanol, and slightly soluble in water.

Each tablet contains:

Active Ingredient: terbinafine hydrochloride, USP (equivalent to 250 mg terbinafine)

Inactive Ingredients: colloidal silicon dioxide, ferric oxide, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, and sodium starch glycolate.

12 CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

12.1 Mechanism of Action

Terbinafine is an allylamine antifungal [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.4) ].

12.2 Pharmacodynamics

The pharmacodynamics of terbinafine tablets is unknown.

12.3 Pharmacokinetics

Following oral administration, terbinafine is well absorbed (greater than 70%) and the bioavailability of terbinafine tablets as a result of first-pass metabolism is approximately 40%. Peak plasma concentrations of 1 mcg/mL appear within 2 hours after a single 250 mg dose; the AUC is approximately 4.56 mcg.h/mL. An increase in the AUC of terbinafine of less than 20% is observed when terbinafine tablets are administered with food.

In plasma, terbinafine is greater than 99% bound to plasma proteins and there are no specific binding sites. At steady-state, in comparison to a single dose, the peak concentration of terbinafine is 25% higher and plasma AUC increases by a factor of 2.5; the increase in plasma AUC is consistent with an effective half-life of ~36 hours. Terbinafine is distributed to the sebum and skin. A terminal half-life of 200 to 400 hours may represent the slow elimination of terbinafine from tissues such as skin and adipose. Prior to excretion, terbinafine is extensively metabolized by at least 7 CYP isoenzymes with major contributions from CYP2C9, CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C8, and CYP2C19. No metabolites have been identified that have antifungal activity similar to terbinafine. Approximately 70% of the administered dose is eliminated in the urine.

In patients with renal impairment (creatinine clearance less than or equal to 50 mL/min) or hepatic cirrhosis, the clearance of terbinafine is decreased by approximately 50% compared to normal volunteers. No effect of gender on the blood levels of terbinafine was detected in clinical trials. No clinically relevant age-dependent changes in steady-state plasma concentrations of terbinafine have been reported.

12.4 Microbiology

Terbinafine, an allylamine antifungal, inhibits biosynthesis of ergosterol, an essential component of fungal cell membrane, via inhibition of squalene epoxidase enzyme. This results in fungal cell death primarily due to the increased membrane permeability mediated by the accumulation of high concentrations of squalene but not due to ergosterol deficiency. Depending on the concentration of the drug and the fungal species test in vitro , terbinafine hydrochloride may be fungicidal. However, the clinical significance of in vitro data is unknown.

Terbinafine has been shown to be active against most strains of the following microorganisms both in vitro and in clinical infections:

Trichophyton mentagrophytes

Trichophyton rubrum

The following in vitro data are available, but their clinical significance is unknown. In vitro , terbinafine exhibits satisfactory MIC’s against most strains of the following microorganisms; however, the safety and efficacy of terbinafine in treating clinical infections due to these microorganisms have not been established in adequate and well-controlled clinical trials:

Candida albicans

Epidermophyton floccosum

Scopulariopsis brevicaulis

13 NONCLINICAL TOXICOLOGY

13.1 Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

In a 28 month oral carcinogenicity study in rats, an increase in the incidence of liver tumors was observed in males at the highest dose tested, 69 mg/kg/day (2 times the MRHD based on AUC comparisons of the parent terbinafine); however, even though dose-limiting toxicity was not achieved at the highest tested dose, higher doses were not tested.

The results of a variety of in vitro (mutations in E. coli and S. typhimurium, DNA repair in rat hepatocytes, mutagenicity in Chinese hamster fibroblasts, chromosome aberration, and sister chromatid exchanges in Chinese hamster lung cells), and in vivo (chromosome aberration in Chinese hamsters, micronucleus test in mice) genotoxicity tests gave no evidence of a mutagenic or clastogenic potential.

Oral reproduction studies in rats at doses up to 300 mg/kg/day (12 times the MRHD based on BSA comparisons) did not reveal any specific effects on fertility or other reproductive parameters. Intravaginal application of terbinafine hydrochloride at 150 mg/day in pregnant rabbits did not increase the incidence of abortions or premature deliveries nor affect fetal parameters.

RxDrugLabels.com provides trustworthy package insert and label information about marketed prescription drugs as submitted by manufacturers to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Package information is not reviewed or updated separately by RxDrugLabels.com. Every individual prescription drug label and package insert entry contains a unique identifier which can be used to secure further details directly from the U.S. National Institutes of Health and/or the FDA.

As a leading independent provider of trustworthy medication information, we source our database directly from the FDA's central repository of drug labels and package inserts under the Structured Product Labeling standard. RxDrugLabels.com provides the full prescription-only subset of the FDA's repository. Medication information provided here is not intended as a substitute for direct consultation with a qualified health professional.

Terms of Use | Copyright © 2022. All Rights Reserved.