Prescription Drug Information: Trimethoprim (Page 2 of 2)

Drug/Laboratory Test Interactions

Trimethoprim can interfere with a serum methotrexate assay as determined by the Competitive Binding Protein Technique (CBPA) when a bacterial dihydrofolate reductase is used as the binding protein. No interference occurs, however, if methotrexate is measured by a radioimmunoassay (RIA).

The presence of trimethoprim may also interfere with the Jaffé alkaline picrate reaction assay for creatinine resulting in over estimations of about 10% in the range of normal values.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Carcinogenesis

Long-term studies in animals to evaluate carcinogenic potential have not been conducted with trimethoprim.

Mutagenesis

Trimethoprim was demonstrated to be non-mutagenic in the Ames assay. In studies at two laboratories, no chromosomal damage was detected in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells at concentrations approximately 500 times human plasma levels; at concentrations approximately 1000 times human plasma levels in these same cells, a low level of chromosomal damage was induced at one of the laboratories. No chromosomal abnormalities were observed in cultured human leukocytes at concentrations of trimethoprim up to 20 times human steady-state plasma levels. No chromosomal effects were detected in peripheral lymphocytes of human subjects receiving 320 mg of trimethoprim in combination with up to 1600 mg of sulfamethoxazole per day for as long as 112 weeks.

Impairment of Fertility

No adverse effects on fertility or general reproductive performance were observed in rats given trimethoprim in oral dosages as high as 70 mg/kg/day for males and 14 mg/kg/day for females.

Pregnancy

Teratogenic Effects

Pregnancy Category C. Trimethoprim has been shown to be teratogenic in the rat when given in doses 40 times the human dose. In some rabbit studies, the overall increase in fetal loss (dead and resorbed and malformed conceptuses) was associated with doses six times the human therapeutic dose.

While there are no large, well-controlled studies on the use of trimethoprim in pregnant women, Brumfitt and Pursell,3 in a retrospective study, reported the outcome of 186 pregnancies during which the mother received either placebo or trimethoprim in combination with sulfamethoxazole. The incidence of congenital abnormalities was 4.5% (3 of 66) in those who received placebo and 3.3% (4 of 120) in those receiving trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole. There were no abnormalities in the 10 children whose mothers received the drug during the first trimester. In a separate survey, Brumfitt and Pursell also found no congenital abnormalities in 35 children whose mothers had received trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole at the time of conception or shortly thereafter.

Because trimethoprim may interfere with folic acid metabolism, trimethoprim should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Nonteratogenic Effects

The oral administration of trimethoprim to rats at a dose of 70 mg/kg/day commencing with the last third of gestation and continuing through parturition and lactation caused no deleterious effects on gestation or pup growth and survival.

Nursing Mothers

Trimethoprim is excreted in human milk. Because trimethoprim may interfere with folic acid metabolism, caution should be exercised when trimethoprim is administered to a nursing woman.

Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients below the age of 2 months have not been established. The effectiveness of trimethoprim as a single agent has not been established in pediatric patients under 12 years of age.

Adverse Reactions to Trimethoprim

The adverse effects encountered most often with trimethoprim were rash and pruritus.

Dermatologic

Rash, pruritus, and phototoxic skin eruptions. At the recommended dosage regimens of 100 mg b.i.d. or 200 mg q.d. each for 10 days, the incidence of rash is 2.9% to 6.7%. In clinical studies which employed high doses of trimethoprim, an elevated incidence of rash was noted. These rashes were maculopapular, morbilliform, pruritic, and generally mild to moderate, appearing 7 to 14 days after the initiation of therapy.

Hypersensitivity

Rare reports of exfoliative dermatitis, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis (Lyell Syndrome), and anaphylaxis have been received.

Gastrointestinal

Epigastric distress, nausea, vomiting, and glossitis. Elevation of serum transaminase and bilirubin has been noted, but the significance of this finding is unknown. Cholestatic jaundice has been rarely reported.

Hematologic

Thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, neutropenia, megaloblastic anemia, and methemoglobinemia.

Metabolic

Hyperkalemia, hyponatremia.

Neurologic

Aseptic meningitis has been rarely reported.

Miscellaneous

Fever, and increases in BUN and serum creatinine levels.

OVERDOSAGE

Acute

Signs of acute overdosage with trimethoprim may appear following ingestion of 1 gram or more of the drug and include nausea, vomiting, dizziness, headaches, mental depression, confusion and bone marrow depression (see Chronic subsection).

Treatment consists of gastric lavage and general supportive measures. Acidification of the urine will increase renal elimination of trimethoprim. Peritoneal dialysis is not effective and hemodialysis only moderately effective in eliminating the drug.

Chronic

Use of trimethoprim at high doses and/or for extended periods of time may cause bone marrow depression manifested as thrombocytopenia, leukopenia and/or megaloblastic anemia. If signs of bone marrow depression occur, trimethoprim should be discontinued and the patient should be given leucovorin; 5 to 15 mg leucovorin daily has been recommended by some investigators.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

The usual oral adult dosage is 100 mg of trimethoprim every 12 hours or 200 mg trimethoprim (two 100 mg tablets) every 24 hours, each for 10 days. The use of trimethoprim in patients with a creatinine clearance of less than 15 mL/min is not recommended. For patients with a creatinine clearance of 15 to 30 mL/min, the dose should be 50 mg every 12 hours.

HOW SUPPLIED

Trimethoprim Tablets USP, 100 mg are scored, oval-shaped, white tablets imprinted “DAN DAN” and “5571” supplied in bottles of 100.

Dispense in a tight, light-resistant container with child-resistant closure.

Store at controlled room temperature 15°-30°C (59°-86°F) in a dry place.

REFERENCES

  1. National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. Methods for Dilution Antimicrobial Susceptibility Tests for Bacteria That Grow Aerobically. 3rd ed.: Approved Standard. NCCLS Document M7-A3. Vol. 13. No. 25. Villanova. Pa: NCCLS: 1993.

  2. National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Disk Susceptibility Tests. 5th ed.: Approved Standard. NCCLS Document M2-A5. Vol. 13. No. 24. Villanova. Pa: NCCLS: 1993.

  3. Brumfitt W, Pursell R. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in the treatment of bacteriuria in women. J Infect Dis. 1973;128(suppl):S657-S663.

Manufactured by:
DANBURY PHARMACAL, INC.
Danbury, CT 06810

Rev: April 2000

TRIMETHOPRIM
trimethoprim tablet
Product Information
Product Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG Item Code (Source) NDC:0591-5571
Route of Administration ORAL DEA Schedule
Active Ingredient/Active Moiety
Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength
Trimethoprim (Trimethoprim) Trimethoprim 100 mg
Inactive Ingredients
Ingredient Name Strength
anhydrous lactose
collodial silicon dioxide
magnesium searate
sodium lauryl sulfate
sodium starch glycolate
stearic acid
Product Characteristics
Color WHITE Score 2 pieces
Shape OVAL Size 9mm
Flavor Imprint Code DAN;DAN;5571
Contains
Coating false Symbol false
Packaging
# Item Code Package Description Multilevel Packaging
1 NDC:0591-5571-01 100 TABLET (100 TABLET) in 1 BOTTLE None
Labeler — Watson Labs

Revised: 01/2007 Watson Labs

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