Prescription Drug Information: VENLAFAXINE HYDROCHLORIDE (Page 3 of 8)

5.4 Angle Closure Glaucoma

Angle-Closure Glaucoma: The pupillary dilation that occurs following use of many antidepressant drugs including venlafaxine may trigger an angle closure attack in a patient with anatomically narrow angles who does not have a patent iridectomy.

5.5 Discontinuation of Treatment with Venlafaxine Extended-Release Tablets

Discontinuation symptoms have been systematically evaluated in patients taking venlafaxine, to include prospective analyses of clinical trials and retrospective surveys of trials in major depressive disorder and social anxiety disorder. Abrupt discontinuation or dose reduction of venlafaxine at various doses has been found to be associated with the appearance of new symptoms, the frequency of which increased with increased dose level and with longer duration of treatment. Reported symptoms include agitation, anorexia, anxiety, confusion, impaired coordination and balance, diarrhea, dizziness, dry mouth, dysphoric mood, fasciculation, fatigue, headaches, hypomania, insomnia, nausea, nervousness, nightmares, sensory disturbances (including shock-like electrical sensations), somnolence, sweating, tremor, vertigo, and vomiting.

During marketing of venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules, other SNRI’s (Serotonin and Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors), and SSRI’s (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors), there have been spontaneous reports of adverse reactions occurring upon discontinuation of these drugs, particularly when abrupt, including the following: dysphoric mood, irritability, agitation, dizziness, sensory disturbances (e.g. paresthesias such as electric shock sensations), anxiety, confusion, headache, lethargy, emotional lability, insomnia, hypomania, tinnitus, and seizures. While these reactions are generally self-limiting, there have been reports of serious discontinuation symptoms.

Patients should be monitored for these symptoms when discontinuing treatment with venlafaxine extended-release tablets. A gradual reduction in the dose rather than abrupt cessation is recommended whenever possible. If intolerable symptoms occur following a decrease in the dose or upon discontinuation of treatment, then resuming the previously prescribed dose may be considered. Subsequently, the physician may continue decreasing the dose but at a more gradual rate [ see Dosage and Administration (2.4) ].

5.6 Insomnia and Nervousness

Treatment-emergent insomnia and nervousness were more commonly reported for patients treated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules than with placebo in pooled analyses of short-term major depressive disorder and other clinical studies, as shown in Table 5.

Table -- 5
(click image for full-size original)

Insomnia and nervousness each led to drug discontinuation in 0.9% of the patients treated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules in major depressive disorder studies.

In other clinical trials, insomnia and nervousness led to drug discontinuation in 2% and 1%, respectively, of the patients treated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules up to 12 weeks.

5.7 Changes in Weight

Adult Patients: A loss of 5% or more of body weight occurred in 7% of patients treated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules and 2% of placebo-treated patients in the short-term placebo-controlled major depressive disorder trials. The discontinuation rate for weight loss associated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules was 0.1% in major depressive disorder studies. In other placebo-controlled trials, 4% of the patients treated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules and 1% of the placebo-treated patients sustained a loss of 7% or more of body weight during up to 6 months of treatment. None of the patients receiving venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules in other studies discontinued for weight loss.

The safety and efficacy of venlafaxine therapy in combination with weight loss agents, including phentermine, have not been established. Co-administration of venlafaxine extended-release tablets and weight loss agents is not recommended. Venlafaxine extended-release tablets are not indicated for weight loss alone or in combination with other products.

Pediatric Patients: Weight loss has been observed in pediatric patients (ages 6-17) receiving venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules. In a pooled analysis of four eight-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, flexible dose outpatient trials for major depressive disorder (MDD) and another disorder, patients treated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules lost an average of 0.45 kg (n = 333), while placebo-treated patients gained an average of 0.77 kg (n = 333). More patients treated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules than with placebo experienced a weight loss of at least 3.5% in the studies (18% of patients treated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules vs. 3.6% of placebo-treated patients; p<0.001). In a 16-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, flexible dose outpatient study for another disorder, venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsule-treated patients lost an average of 0.75 kg (n=137), while placebo-treated patients gained an average of 0.76 kg (n=148). More patients treated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules than with placebo experienced a weight loss of at least 3.5% in the study (47% of patients treated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules vs. 14% of placebo-treated patients; p<0.001). Weight loss was not limited to patients with treatment-emergent anorexia [ see Warnings and Precautions (5.9) ].

The risks associated with longer-term use of venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules were assessed in an open-label MDD study of children and adolescents who received venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules for up to six months. The children and adolescents in the study had increases in weight that were less than expected based on data from age-and sex-matched peers. The difference between observed weight gain and expected weight gain was larger for children (<12 years old) than for adolescents (≥12 years old).

5.8 Changes in Height

Pediatric Patients: During an eight-week, placebo-controlled non-MDD study, venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsule-treated patients (ages 6-17) grew an average of 0.3 cm (n=122), while placebo-treated patients grew an average of 1.0 cm (n=132); p=0.041. This difference in height increase was most notable in patients younger than twelve. During the eight-week placebo-controlled MDD studies, venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsule-treated patients grew an average of 0.8 cm (n = 146), while placebo-treated patients grew an average of 0.7 cm (n = 147). During a 16-week, placebo-controlled non-MDD study, both the venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsule-treated patients (n=109) and the placebo-treated (n=112) patients each grew an average of 1.0 cm. In the six-month, open-label MDD study, children and adolescents had height increases that were less than expected based on data from age-and sex-matched peers. The difference between observed growth rates and expected growth rates was larger for children (<12 years old) than for adolescents (≥12 years old).

5.9 Changes in Appetite

Adult Patients: Treatment-emergent anorexia was more commonly reported for patients treated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules (8%) than for placebo-treated patients (4%) in the pool of short-term, double-blind, placebo-controlled major depressive disorder studies. The discontinuation rate for anorexia associated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules was 1.0% in major depressive disorder studies. Treatment-emergent anorexia was more commonly reported for patients treated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules (20%) than for placebo-treated patients (2%) in the pool of short-term, double-blind, placebo-controlled Social Anxiety Disorder studies. The discontinuation rate for anorexia was 0.4% for patients receiving venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules for up to 12 weeks in Social Anxiety Disorder studies.

Pediatric Patients: Decreased appetite has been observed in pediatric patients receiving venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules. In placebo-controlled trials in MDD and another disorder, 10% of patients aged 6-17 treated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules for up to eight weeks and 3% of patients treated with placebo reported treatment-emergent anorexia (decreased appetite). None of the patients receiving venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules discontinued for anorexia or weight loss.

In a placebo-controlled non-MDD trial, 22% and 3% of patients aged 8-17 treated for up to 16 weeks with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules and placebo, respectively, reported treatment-emergent anorexia (decreased appetite). The discontinuation rates for anorexia were 0.7% and 0.0% for patients receiving venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules and placebo, respectively; the discontinuation rates for weight loss were 0.7% for patients receiving either venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules or placebo.

5.10 Activation of Mania/Hypomania

During premarketing major depressive disorder studies, mania or hypomania occurred in 0.3% of patients treated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules and 0.0% placebo patients. In premarketing Social Anxiety Disorder studies, no patients treated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules and no placebo-treated patients experienced mania or hypomania. In all premarketing major depressive disorder trials with venlafaxine hydrochloride immediate-release tablets, mania or hypomania occurred in 0.5% of venlafaxine-treated patients compared with 0% of placebo patients. Mania/hypomania has also been reported in a small proportion of patients with mood disorders who were treated with other marketed drugs to treat major depressive disorder. As with all drugs effective in the treatment of major depressive disorder, venlafaxine extended-release tablets should be used cautiously in patients with a history of mania.

5.11 Hyponatremia

Hyponatremia may occur as a result of treatment with SSRI’s and SNRI’s, including venlafaxine extended-release tablets. In many cases, this hyponatremia appears to be the result of the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Cases with serum sodium lower than 110 mmol/L have been reported. Elderly patients may be at greater risk of developing hyponatremia with SSRIs and SNRIs. Also, patients taking diuretics or who are otherwise volume depleted may be at greater risk [ see Use in Specific Populations (8.5) ]. Discontinuation of venlafaxine extended-release tablets should be considered in patients with symptomatic hyponatremia and appropriate medical intervention should be instituted.

Signs and symptoms of hyponatremia include headache, difficulty concentrating, memory impairment, confusion, weakness, and unsteadiness, which may lead to falls. Signs and symptoms associated with more severe and/or acute cases have included hallucination, syncope, seizure, coma, respiratory arrest, and death.

5.12 Seizures

During premarketing experience, no seizures occurred among 705 patients treated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules in the major depressive disorder studies or among 277 patients treated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended-release capsules in Social Anxiety Disorder studies. In all premarketing major depressive disorder trials with venlafaxine hydrochloride immediate-release tablets, seizures were reported at various doses in 0.3% (8/3082) of venlafaxine-treated patients. Venlafaxine extended-release tablets, like many antidepressants, should be used cautiously in patients with a history of seizures and should be discontinued in any patient who develops seizures.

5.13 Abnormal Bleeding

SSRIs and SNRIs, including venlafaxine extended-release tablets, may increase the risk of bleeding events. Concomitant use of aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, warfarin, and other anticoagulants may add to this risk. Case reports and epidemiological studies (case-control and cohort design) have demonstrated an association between use of drugs that interfere with serotonin reuptake and the occurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding. Bleeding events related to SSRIs and SNRIs use have ranged from ecchymoses, hematomas, epistaxis, and petechiae to life-threatening hemorrhages.

Patients should be cautioned about the risk of bleeding associated with the concomitant use of venlafaxine extended-release tablets and NSAIDs, aspirin, or other drugs that affect coagulation.

RxDrugLabels.com provides trustworthy package insert and label information about marketed prescription drugs as submitted by manufacturers to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Package information is not reviewed or updated separately by RxDrugLabels.com. Every individual prescription drug label and package insert entry contains a unique identifier which can be used to secure further details directly from the U.S. National Institutes of Health and/or the FDA.

Medication Sections

Medication Information by RSS

As a leading independent provider of trustworthy medication information, we source our database directly from the FDA's central repository of drug labels and package inserts under the Structured Product Labeling standard. RxDrugLabels.com provides the full prescription-only subset of the FDA's repository. Medication information provided here is not intended as a substitute for direct consultation with a qualified health professional.

Terms of Use | Copyright © 2021. All Rights Reserved.